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Marine biology
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Marine biology

Marine Biology: A Study of Marine Animals What is Marine Biology (summary) Marine Biology is a branch of biology that studies living things living in marine (saltwater) ecosystems. This science relates to others, such as: Oceanography, Botany, Zoology, Ecology and Marine Geology.

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Schistosomiasis

Shistosoma Parasite: Disease Cause What it is - Definition Schistosomiasis, also known as bilharziasis, is a disease caused by human parasites, the trematodes, of the genus Schistosoma. Disease-causing There are three types of worms: Schistosoma haematobium, which causes bladder schistosomiasis in Africa, Australia, Asia and Southern Europe; Schistosoma japonicum (causes katayama disease) found in China, Japan, the Philippines and Taiwan, and Schistosoma Mansoni, responsible for the cause of intestinal schistosomiasis; The latter is found in Central America, India, the Antilles and Brazil.
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Celiac disease

Wheat: Gluten Presence What it is Celiac disease is a disease caused by the body's intolerance to gluten (protein found in wheat flour, oats, barley, malt, rye and its derivatives). Therefore, their bearers should not consume pasta, pizza, bread, cakes, cookies, some sweets, beer, whiskey, etc.
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Hypertension

Blood Pressure Measurement: Prevention What It Is Hypertension, also known as high blood pressure, is a silent disease that affects the blood vessels, heart, brain, eyes and kidneys. Causes and Triggering Factors Because it is a silent disease, that is, it has some symptoms only when the pressure is very high, it can often go unnoticed to a major complication, with the involvement of one of the organs mentioned above.
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Typhoid fever

Enteric Salmonella Typhi: Typhoid-Causing Bacteria (Enlarged Microscope Image) What It is Typhoid fever is a disease caused by a bacterium called Salmonella enterica Typhi serotype. Typhoid Symptoms Its most common symptoms are malaise, high fever, poor appetite, dry cough, diarrhea or constipation, headaches, slowed heartbeat, enlarged spleen and pink spots on the skin. in the trunk region.
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Alzheimer's disease

Dr. Alois Alzheimer: Early Studies of the Disease in 1901 Introduction Alzheimer's disease is a degenerative brain disease that affects almost half of people over eighty-five years of age and causes great social and economic damage. Important Information Although the exact cause of this disease is still unknown, it is already known that genetic predisposition is a very relevant factor.
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Rubella

Rubella-marked human skin What is rubella Rubella is a disease caused by viruses. Your virus usually doesn't attack very hard and can often go unnoticed. However, this feature makes the disease difficult to diagnose. Information Like many viruses, it enters, it enters our body through the nose or throat.
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Sinusitis

Regions (in red) affected by sinusitis What is sinusitis Sinusitis is an inflammation of the paranasal sinuses, usually associated with an infectious process. The paranasal sinuses are formed by a group of aerated cavities that open inside the nose and develop into the bones of the face. Important Information and Types The most common factors that can trigger sinusitis are influenza, allergy, deviated nasal septum, and unfavorable weather conditions.
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Biomes

Aquatic biome Introduction - What it is In ecology, a biome is called a biological community, that is, fauna and flora and their interactions with each other and with the physical environment: soil, water and air. Biotic area and the main characteristics of biomes Biotic area is a geographical area occupied by a biome, ie regions with the same type of climate and vegetation.
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Ecologically Correct Attitudes

Actions that can help in preserving the environment Introduction There are many attitudes that people, governments, and businesses can do not to harm the environment. Many of them are simple and can make a difference to preserving the environment today and in the future. Key Eco-Friendly Attitudes For Citizens (Ordinary People) - Sort waste (organic and recyclable) to facilitate the process of separate collection and recycling.
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Mutualism

Mutualism between cattle and bird: benefits for both What it is - definition Mutualism is an interaction (relationship) between two species, where benefits for both occur. That is, by living together, the two species gain in some respect. In mutualism, species may or may not live together, depending on the type of relationship.
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Trophic Levels

Trophic Levels: position in the ecological pyramid What they are (definition) In any ecological pyramid that exists in nature we find trophic levels. Each of these levels represents the position of organisms in the pyramid. This position is determined by the number of power transfer steps. Main characteristics of trophic levels When the position of organisms is at the lowest trophic level, it means that these organisms are the primary producers.
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Eutrophication

Green water from a lake: eutrophication Introduction (what it is) We like to walk on the edge of a lake. Over time we noticed an unpleasant smell coming from him. It's just that a process called eutrophication is taking place there. A terrestrial or aquatic environment that goes through this is becoming eutrophic. The word trophía can be translated from Greek to Portuguese as a nutritional condition.
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Virus

Influenza (influenza) virus: microscope image What it is - biological definition The word virus has its origin in Latin and means toxin or poison. The virus is a biological organism with high replication capacity, using the structure of a healthy (host) cell. It is an agent capable of causing diseases in animals and vegetables.
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Archaeobacteria

Sulfolobus sp .: example of archaebacteria What they are (biological definition) Archaebacteria are prokaryotic beings belonging to the Archaea group. They are primitive bacteria, and there are only about twenty species. Key Features - Possess the ability to live in places where living conditions are extremely adverse for the vast majority of living things.
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Commensalism

Hyena and lion have a commensal relationship What is - definition Commensalism is an ecological relationship between two organisms in which one benefits without harming the other. This benefit is usually related to the food obtained by the diner. In this harmonic interspecific relationship (between different species) (there is no harm to any species involved), the individual who benefits is called the commensal.
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Microbiology Areas

Microbiology: a science that studies microorganisms What is Microbiology - definition Microbiology is a science, a branch of biology, that studies microorganisms, which are very small living beings (viewed only with the aid of microscopes) and popularly known as microbes. Microbial Genetics - Medical Microbiology - Clinical Microbiology - Microbial Physiology - Veterinary Microbiology - Industrial Microbiology - Environmental Microbiology - Food Microbiology - Space Microbiology - Evolutionary Microbiology - Aeromicrobiology (studies of microorganisms carried by air).
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Ecosystem

Atlantic Forest: An Example of a Brazilian Ecosystem Introduction Ecosystem is a community of organisms that interact with each other and with the environment to which they belong. We can cite as an example of environment: lake, forest, savannah, tundra, etc. Understanding the ecosystem: key features All abiotic (lifeless) components, such as minerals, ions, organic compounds and climate (temperature, precipitation and other physical factors) are also part of a system.
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Bacterial Endospores

Bacillus anthracis: an example of a bacterium that produces endospores What they are and function Bacterial endospores are structures of bacteria whose function is to provide resistance and ensure the survival of the organism in an inappropriate environment. They have this name because they are produced inside the bacteria.
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Protozoan Filos

Giardia Lamblia: protozoan example of the Phylum Plasmodroma Definition (what they are) Protozoans are unicellular (single-cell living) micro-organisms (eukaryotic). Protozoa are part of the Protist Kingdom. Protozoan Phylum: - Amoebozoa Phylum - Cercozoa Phylum - Choanozoa Phylum - Ciliophora Phylum - Euglenozoa Phylum - Loukozoa Phylum - Metamonate Phylum - Microsporidia Phylum - Percolozoa Phylum - Plasmodroma Phylum - Sarcomazo Phyla protozoa : - Amoebas, also known as amoebas, are part of the Amoebozoa Phylum.
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Monera Kingdom

Bacillus cereus: causer of foodborne diseases What is - definition Monera is an obsolete biological kingdom and the pioneer in the scientific classification of the other five. It comprises many organisms with prokaryotic cell organization (single-celled organisms without the membrane surrounding the nucleus - library - and without the presence of DNA-associated proteins).
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